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Domestic violence Archives

Domestic violence bill passed by Washington State House

According to federal law, when a person is charged with domestic violence and a court issues a protection order against the alleged offender, all firearms must be surrendered. In Washington State, though, the current law still allows those charged with domestic violence to keep their weapons.

Domestic abuse more likely if weapon used in first incident

A new study has revealed interesting findings about the risk for subsequent domestic violence abuse incidents for women. The study researchers examined domestic violence calls to police by 6,000 Seattle, Washington, couples over a two-year period. The researchers expected to find that such calls could be predicted simply by where someone lived. Previous studies have shown that those living in "poor urban neighborhoods" had more for reports domestic violence.

Domestic violence gun law in front of U.S. Supreme Court

The Justices who sit on our nation's Supreme Court heard arguments on Jan. 15 on how to define violence as it pertains to domestic violence offenders and a federal gun law. The debate was mainly centered around guns, but it became much more than that when the Justices began to try to determine what actions may cause intentional or unintentional harm or what is actual violence.

Study: Domestic violence increases with alcohol, but not cannabis

According to researchers at Florida State and the University of Tennessee, alcohol use by men increased the risks of aggression toward an intimate partner. However, the use of marijuana did not seem to increase the risk of a domestic violence incident.

Amputee from canyon accident arrested on domestic violence

Aron Ralston made headlines in 2003 when he amputated his right arm in order to escape from a canyon in Utah. His story was the subject of a book and the movie "127 Hours," which was nominated for an Oscar. Ralston, 38, is in the news again, but for a very different reason.

Mom, 2 teens jailed for not testifying in domestic violence trial

In the state of Washington, domestic violence is a very broad term that can involve any crime between two people who reside in the same household, have a child together or are related by blood or marriage. There does not need to be an actual assault for a domestic violence arrest. Alleged victims can make claims of the assault - or simply that they are in fear of assault - and an arrest can be made. Prosecutors will proceed with domestic violence cases even when the alleged victim no longer wants to press charges or does not want to testify. This is what happened in Kelso, Washington.

Domestic violence affects diverse groups

Even though it may seem more common in certain areas or demographic groups, domestic violence can happen to anyone. One Washington lawmaker, state Rep. Elizabeth Scott, is among the most outspoken advocates for domestic violence victims in the area, not only because she is a politician, but also because she was herself a victim. The 47-year-old woman recently shared her personal abuse story for the first time in public, proving that any relationship has the potential to become dangerous for its members.

Domestic violence affects diverse groups

Even though it may seem more common in certain areas or demographic groups, domestic violence can happen to anyone. One Washington lawmaker, state Rep. Elizabeth Scott, is among the most outspoken advocates for domestic violence victims in the area, not only because she is a politician, but also because she was herself a victim. The 47-year-old woman recently shared her personal abuse story for the first time in public, proving that any relationship has the potential to become dangerous for its members.

Allegations of animal abuse uncover domestic violence assault

In the state of Washington, the term "domestic violence" does not just apply to a crime involving two people who are intimately involved or married. It can also apply to people who are related, have a child together or who simply live in the same house together. Police do not need to know that actual physical harm has taken place in order for an arrest to take place, as there only needs to an accusation by a victim who alleges that he or she has been harmed or is in fear of being harmed. Many times, the prosecution will file charges even if the victim does not wish for the case to proceed.

A lawyer can help during a domestic violence situation

It is important to understand how destructive domestic violence can be for the victim and those who support her or him. Many people -- even the victims, on occasion -- do not allow themselves to fully comprehend the gravity of an abusive relationship. A victim's emotional and physical wellbeing are at stake and, in a worst-case scenario, the victim could die at the hands of the abuser. There are many ways to get help though; this is when legal professionals can be extremely helpful to a person who is caught in an abusive situation that seems to present no exit.

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