[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Jump to Navigation

Posts tagged "domestic violence"

Domestic violence gun law in front of U.S. Supreme Court

The Justices who sit on our nation's Supreme Court heard arguments on Jan. 15 on how to define violence as it pertains to domestic violence offenders and a federal gun law. The debate was mainly centered around guns, but it became much more than that when the Justices began to try to determine what actions may cause intentional or unintentional harm or what is actual violence.

Study: Domestic violence increases with alcohol, but not cannabis

According to researchers at Florida State and the University of Tennessee, alcohol use by men increased the risks of aggression toward an intimate partner. However, the use of marijuana did not seem to increase the risk of a domestic violence incident.

Mom, 2 teens jailed for not testifying in domestic violence trial

In the state of Washington, domestic violence is a very broad term that can involve any crime between two people who reside in the same household, have a child together or are related by blood or marriage. There does not need to be an actual assault for a domestic violence arrest. Alleged victims can make claims of the assault - or simply that they are in fear of assault - and an arrest can be made. Prosecutors will proceed with domestic violence cases even when the alleged victim no longer wants to press charges or does not want to testify. This is what happened in Kelso, Washington.

Domestic violence affects diverse groups

Even though it may seem more common in certain areas or demographic groups, domestic violence can happen to anyone. One Washington lawmaker, state Rep. Elizabeth Scott, is among the most outspoken advocates for domestic violence victims in the area, not only because she is a politician, but also because she was herself a victim. The 47-year-old woman recently shared her personal abuse story for the first time in public, proving that any relationship has the potential to become dangerous for its members.

Domestic violence affects diverse groups

Even though it may seem more common in certain areas or demographic groups, domestic violence can happen to anyone. One Washington lawmaker, state Rep. Elizabeth Scott, is among the most outspoken advocates for domestic violence victims in the area, not only because she is a politician, but also because she was herself a victim. The 47-year-old woman recently shared her personal abuse story for the first time in public, proving that any relationship has the potential to become dangerous for its members.

Allegations of animal abuse uncover domestic violence assault

In the state of Washington, the term "domestic violence" does not just apply to a crime involving two people who are intimately involved or married. It can also apply to people who are related, have a child together or who simply live in the same house together. Police do not need to know that actual physical harm has taken place in order for an arrest to take place, as there only needs to an accusation by a victim who alleges that he or she has been harmed or is in fear of being harmed. Many times, the prosecution will file charges even if the victim does not wish for the case to proceed.

Take court seriously or you could feel the repercussions

A former player for the National Football League was recently in court after pleading no contest in an altercation with his former wife last August. The court hearing addressed the allegations of domestic violence made against the man, Chad Johnson. According to reports, he and his wife were having a disagreement when he allegedly head-butted her. The two had barely been married a month when she filed for divorce soon after the incident. Not only did this affect his marriage, it also affected his status as an active player: He was released by his team before he got to play a single game that season.

No-fault divorce is advantageous for abuse victims

Divorce happens for a number of reasons. Some couples choose to split because they no longer love one another, others dissolve the marriage because of adultery. While there are plenty of other reasons that a divorce may happen, there is the possibility of abuse. This may be the most tragic reason for a couple to get a divorce because it often means that the victim has been dealing with the abuse--be it physical or emotional--for a considerable amount of time.

Domestic violence and guns: a lethal mix

Federal law mandates that any person of an order of protection surrender any firearms, even if they are legally held. Even though this law exists, it is rarely applied in any state, even Washington, leaving victims of domestic violence at risk for physical injury or death.

Many organizations seek to help victims of domestic abuse

Domestic violence is a dangerous reality for some families in Washington. Though many of stories about domestic abuse are tragic, the good news is that there are many ways to get out of these relationships. When a person files a domestic violence complaint, the alleged abuser may soon find a protective order filed against them, barring them from coming in contact with the person who has been supposedly victimized.

Washington children of violent/abused parents suffer the effects

We know that divorces can be difficult on kids and we know that how parents act around kids can seriously affect their own growth and actions, but how are kids dealing with a situation where the guardians in their home are abusive? Washington residents may want to know of a recent source that explains the potentially serious ramifications of a child living in a home where abuse takes place.

Landmark domestic violence law up for reauthorization in Senate

The Violence Against Women Act was designed to assist victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. It seems to have worked. In fact, since VAWA's enactment in 1994, domestic violence rates have dropped more than 50 percent. Last year, however, the authorization for this landmark law expired, placing its future and the future of the many vital programs it helped create in doubt.

VAWA: Preventing domestic violence or enabling dishonest parties?

Soon after a high-profile murder case, Congress enacted legislation called the Violence Against Woman Act, aimed at preventing domestic violence and providing extra funding for the investigation and prosecution of offenders. But a report by non-profit group Stop Abusive and Violent Environments revealed that over 700,000 people are arrested on false domestic violence charges every year.

Washington recognizes October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month

President Barack Obama has announced that October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The announcement came partially as a response to recent statistics showing that domestic violence is an increasing problem throughout the world. During the president's proclamation, he revealed statistics that showed about three women die each year in the United States due to domestic violence. States like Washington can launch their own awareness programs to help bring domestic violence issues to the public forum.

National campaign to end domestic violence with smart phone app

In Washington, domestic violence can include a wide range of actions. In some situations, an individual may call the police if he or she feels threatened, regardless of whether the individual is actually in physical danger.

Man who beat wife during divorce hearing held without bail

About two months ago, we wrote a post about a man who beat his wife in front of a judge. That man is currently being held in jail without bond for aggravated battery. Although his case garnered a lot of media attention, most cases of domestic violence in Washington are less well-known.

Man beats wife in front of judge; mad about child support orders

When judges in Washington are making decisions regarding child support and child custody, their primary concern is the best interest of the children. There are numerous factors considered that the judge considers, including a history of domestic violence and the relationship each child has with the parents.

Properly using orders of protection during Washington divorce

In Washington, orders of protection can be awarded during divorce in an effort to prevent abuse. Orders of protection are usually constructed in one of two ways - "stay away" or "refrain from" - and both types are intended to foster safer living relations and prevent domestic violence during the divorce process.

Seahawks fans beware: NFL loses can lead to domestic violence

We all get excited about things we care about. It's normal to be passionate, and we enjoy cheering on Washington's beloved Seahawks. However, what happens when that passion and excitement gets too powerful?

Office Location